Module Exam #1

Last update by zajac.19 on 09/15/2013
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Describe the difference between homologous chromosomes and sister chromatids

Answer:

Homologous chromosomes are found in diploid cells i.e they form after fertilization i.e after the union of haploid male "sperm" and haploid female sex cell "oocytes". so similar chromosomes pair.this chromosomes are similar because they are of the same length and they contain the same genes at the same loci, but the alleles for the traits may be different. While sister chromatids are formed prior to cell division.each homologous chromosome replicates itself and forms a sister chromatid,and sister chromatids are identical unlike homologous chromosomes which are just similar to each other

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