Chapter 14

Last update by Shanal on 10/20/2013
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Which of the following statements about Mendel's breeding experiments is correct?

A) None of the parental (P) plants were true-breeding.

B) All of the F2 progeny showed a phenotype that was intermediate between the two parental (P) phenotypes.

C) Half of the F1 progeny had the same phenotype as one of the parental (P) plants, and the other half had the same phenotype as the other parent.

D) All of the F1 progeny resembled one of the parental (P) plants, but only some of the F2 progeny did.

E) none of the above

Answer:
D) All of the F1 progeny resembled one of the parental (P) plants, but only some of the F2 progeny did

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