Aeneid

Last update by 16328 on 04/24/2011
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tempus erat quo prima quies mortalibus aegris
incipit et dono divum gratissima serpit.

Answer:
It was the time when the first rest begins for weary mortals
and by the gift of the gods steals over them most pleasingly.

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    in somnis, ecce, ante oculos maetissimus Hector
    visus adesse mihi largosque effundere fletus,
    raptatus bigis ut quondam, aterque cruento
    pulvere perque pedes traiectus lora tumentes.
    In my sleep, behold, before my eyes most sorrowful Hector
    seemed to be present to me to pour out copious tears,
    dragged by the chariot, as once (he was), and black with blood-stained
    dust and pierced through his swollen feet with thongs.
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    ei mihi, qualis erat, quantum mutatus ab illo
    Hectore qui redit exuvias indutus Achilli
    vel Danaum Phrygios iaculatus puppibus ignes!
    Alas, how, he was, how much changed from that
    Hector who returned wearing the spoils of Achilles
    or having hurled the Phrygian fires at the ships of the Greeks!
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    Answered in Aeneid
    squalentem barbam et concretos sanguine crines
    vulneraque illa gerens, quae circum plurima muros
    accepit patrios. ultro flens ipse videbar
    Bearing an unkempt beard and hair matted with blood
    and those very many wounds, which he received around
    his native walls.
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    Answered in Aeneid
    accepit patrios. ultro flens ipse videbar
    compellare virum et measta expromere voces:
    Weeping I myself seemed to first
    address the man and to utter sorrowful words:
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    Answered in Aeneid
    diverso interea misventur moenia luctu,
    et magis atque magis, quamquam secreta parentis
    Anchisae domus arboribusque obtecta recessit,
    clarescunt sonitus armorumque ingruit horror.
    On every side, meanwhile, the walls are in confusion with wailing,
    and more and more, although the house of my father Anchises
    is secluded and is set back overshadowed by trees,
    the sounds grow clear and the frightening sound of weapons advances threateningly.

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    Answered in Aeneid
    excutior somno et summi fastigia tecti
    acensu supero atque arrectis auribus asto:
    I am aroused from sleep and I reach by climbing the gables
    of the highest roof and I stand with attentive ears
    :
  • 16328
    Answered in Aeneid
    in segtem veluti cum flamma surentibus Austris
    incidit, aut rapidus montano flumine torrens
    sternit agros, sternit sata laeta boumque labores
    praecipitesque trahit silvas; stupet inscius alto
    accipiens sonitum saxi de vertice pastor.
    Just as when fire falls upon a crop with the south winds raging,
    or the swift torrent from a mountain river
    flattens the fields, flattens the happy crops and the labours of oxen
    and drags woods headlong; the bewildered shepherd is astounded
    listening to the noise from the high top of a rock.
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    Answered in Aeneid
    tum vero manifesta fides, Danaumque patescunt
    insidiae. iam Deiphobi dedit ampla ruinam
    Then indeed the truth is clear, and the treachery of the Greeks
    is revealed.
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    Answered in Aeneid
    insidiae. iam Deiphobi dedis ampla ruinam
    Volcano superante domus, iam proximus ardet
    Ucalegon; Sigea igni freta lata relucent.
    is revealed. Now the spacious house of Deiphobus has crashed in ruins
    with the fire overcoming it now nearby
    the house of Ucalegon burns; the wide Trojan straits reflect (the fire).
  • 16328
    Answered in Aeneid
    eitur clamorque virum clangorque tubarum.
    The shouting of men and the blare of trumpets arise.