Test 1

Last update by beverleybrookes on 09/19/2011
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Differences between role conflict, role strain, role distancing, role exit, and role ambiguity

Answer:
Role Conflict-- Consisits of contradictory roles attached to two or more stausesRole Strain--Consists of the contradictory expectations built into any single status

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