11.3 The Kidney

Last update by s.hartonline on 11/15/2010
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11.3.2 Draw and label a diagram of the kidney.

Answer:
cortex shown at the edge of kidney; medulla shown inside the cortex with pyramids; pelvis shown on the concave side of the kidney; ureter shown connecting with the pelvis; renal artery shown connected away from cortex; renal vein shown connected away from cortex;

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